Solving the over medication dilemma

In previous posts, Dr. Green had discussed some of the hazards associated with medication use among older adults. She has also discussed classes of medications that are of concern. In this final post, Dr. Green discusses approaches she has used to deprescribing. Warmest Aloha, [email protected] PS: I say it over and over again: There’s no one more important than the caregiver in the daily life of a frail person.

Medicines that can cause problems in seniors

In our last post Dr. Ariel Green described a patient who improved dramatically when many of her medicines were stopped. In this video, Dr. Green describes the classes of medications that can cause problems in seniors. Dr. Green is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine. Warmest Aloha, [email protected] PS: I say it over and over again: There’s no one more important than the caregiver in the daily life of a frail person.

Medicines, Medicines, Medicines, an Epidemic Problem

Whether it’s hypertension, diabetes, arthritis there’s always a prescription. For every problem there’s one or more drugs. But is this always good? Dr. Ariel Green, Associate Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine points out that medicines are sometimes the problem. Geriatricians know. Every pill is a potential problem. Warmest Aloha, [email protected] PS: I say it over and over again: There’s no one more important than the caregiver in the daily life of a frail person.

“Wow! She really ate well!” 4 Things Caregivers Can Do to Improve an Older Person’s Appetite

I have a dear friend who is incredibly accomplished and independent. I’ve always loved visiting with and hearing about her adventures — including sailing around the world on a sailboat when she was well into her 70s! But on a recent visit, I became concerned. Now 93, my friend was sleeping much of the day. She’d had some falls and was unable to reach her walker on the other side of the room. Most concerning, she’d lost weight. When I checked her kitchen, she had very little food. The leftovers in her fridge were clearly […]

A Patient with Delirium. Don’t Say: “You’re Confused!”

Dr. Inouye has been discussing delirium. By coincidence I recently cared for a patient with acute and distressing delirium. Sue is an 80-year-old woman who has mild Alzheimer’s Disease. Recently she fell and fractured a small bone in her hand. She was seen in the emergency room and a cast was put on. She was given a narcotic, hydrocodone, to relieve the pain. That night, at 1:30 in the morning, she walked over to her neighbor’s house in her nightgown. Her husband was sleeping next to her but didn’t wake up. The neighbors brought her […]

Delirium, prevention and long-term outcomes

For more than 30 years, Dr. Sharon K. Inouye has dedicated herself to the identification and prevention of delirium in the hospital. She created the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), the most widely used method for identification of delirium worldwide. In her last video, Dr. Inouye described the features of delirium. She now discusses preventative strategies and long-term outcomes.

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Dr. Sharon K. Inouye explains delirium in older patients

Acute confusion is extremely common in hospitalized older adults. One third of general medical patients who are 70 years of age or older have delirium. For more than 30 years, Dr. Sharon K. Inouye has dedicated herself to the identification and prevention of delirium in the hospital. She created the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), the most widely used method for identification of delirium worldwide. In addition, she is the champion of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP). In this video, Dr. Inouye explains delirium.

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The Life of a Caregiver: Ojay

I wanted feedback on GeriatricswithAloha.com. A caregiver named Ojay provided that. In the process, I immediately felt that caregivers like Ojay, and patients like his parents,  are the reason I’m working on GeriatricswithAloha. This is the first of a two part video about Ojay. This video talks about how he came to be a caregiver and his daily routine. It was a privilege to get a glimpse of his life.

3 Important No-no’s | Talking to a Person with Dementia /Alzheimer’s Disease

Dad has Alzheimer’s disease. You are a loyal daughter (Jill) who visits often and brings his favorite foods. On one visit, Dad has a big smile when he sees you. “Hi Mary” “Dad, I’m NOT Mary. (Mary is your older sister.)  What’s my name?” “Oh, gosh. Where’s Mary?” “Dad, I’m Jill!! Why do you always ask about Mary? Are you trying to get on my nerves?”